Best dating sim ever

Rated 4.3/5 based on 786 customer reviews

Tinder actually has one of the best user interfaces of any dating app around.

The photos are large, the app is — comparatively speaking — svelte, and setting up your profile is pretty painless. Also, no one can message you unless you have also expressed an interest in them, which means you get no unsolicited messages.

The interface is extremely clunky and the photos are a little small.

You also have to tap on a user’s small image to see a larger version and the person’s profile, which is simply too large for an app.

While there are a fair few people on Tinder who use it strictly to collect swipes, many people are actually inclined to meet up in real life, which is not always the case with dating apps.

Tinder is one of the most popular dating apps too (hitting almost 50 million users back in late 2014), meaning the likelihood of matching with someone you’re interested in who doesn’t live super far away is greater than with apps that have fewer users.

As successful as it is forming long-distance relationships and successful marriages, Tinder has long been accused of changing dating into some form of hookup game.

You create a username and fill out a very long profile, which you can link to your Instagram account if you choose (which is, admittedly, almost Facebook).

To browse for someone you like, you merely tap the “matches” option, which, oddly, does not show you the people you’ve matched with but rather the people you could potentially match with.

If that interface is too chaotic for you, tap the “quickmatch” option, which restricts the results to photos only.

Once you’ve set up your profile and input your preferences, it will send you one “bagel” a day, which is essentially the profile of a potential match.

You then have 24 hours to decide whether you want to “like” or “pass” on your bagel.

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